Search the news archive:
 
Winter Training - Core Weight Workout
 
By Ainslie MacEachran
Date: 10/28/2010
Winter Training - Core Weight Workout
 

Winter Training - Core Weight Workout
After a long cycling season where you’ve been sitting on the bike for lots of hours/miles, the fall/early winter presents a good opportunity to spend a little time shoring up your body and core musculature with winter lifting and cross training.

Because cycling involves so many hours and the body is accumulating fatigue the whole year, there is a tendency for cyclists to become somewhat de-conditioned in their upper bodies and have a decrease in power output as they near end of the season. Additionally, because of the extended hours on the bike, many cyclists frequently experience postural issues.

Over time the traditional approach to winter weights has been a model that follows a periodized, progressive plan that only emphasizes the essential cycling muscles. Leg extension, hamstring curl, leg press or squat, and a handful of exercises to maintenance some upper body. These moves, like riding, are very linear but they don’t service any of your accessory or stabilizer muscles.

With this in mind, a winter training program should include varied exercises that will help create a complete athlete from head to toe. Movements should be primarily compound in nature (utilizing more than one joint) and go beyond 90 degree angles. Additionally, lifting in the past has been slow and controlled but, the musculature will respond more rapidly to moves that are explosive and, in some instances, momentum based.

Moves that will work towards this end can be done with kettlebells, medicine balls and, with proper instruction, Olympic bars. Doing whole body moves will be a nice change from just blasting your quads and hamstrings with endless leg exercises and will help refresh you mentally.

As a natural consequence, you’ll also be able to service some of your quick explosive power. The winter is also a good time to consult a nutritionist about how manage your diet and keep any weight gains of the honest variety (building muscle) instead of the dishonest variety (FAT!).

US Army Master Fitness Trainer and USACycling coach Major T.g. Taylor recommends doing these moves like so:

Hang Cleans
1) From an athletic stance, using an Olympic bar, let the weight hang with arms relaxed.
2) Drop your hips toward the floor. Using your entire body get the weight moving upward.
3) Just before the weight loses upward momentum, drop your hips again to get your elbows under the weight.
The last part of this move is like the very end of a front squat. Let the weight fall back down to the starting position and repeat.

Practice this move with a broom stick first. As you get more advanced your feet will leave the ground momentarily just before you drop your hips the second time.

Click on the photo for a larger image.
 
Step 1 (left)  let the weight hang with arms relaxed. - Step 2 (right) Drop your hips toward the floor. Using your entire body get the weight moving upward


Step 3: Just before the weight loses upward momentum, drop your hips again to get your elbows under the weight.
The last part of this move is like the very end of a front squat.

 Kttlebell Swings
1) Start in a Sumo squat position grasping the weight between your legs just off  the ground.
2) Driving upward with the legs AND creating a quick, short push out of the shoulders; get the weight moving in a circular path upward until its just short of directly overhead.
3) Pause for just a moment at the top. This pause will require your entire core, legs, and upper body to contract. Lower the weight along the same path letting it swing between your legs. Repeat using the swinging momentum to get the weight going back up again.

Click on the photo for a larger image.
  
Step 1 (left)  Start in a Sumo squat position grasping the weight between your legs just off  the ground.- Step 2 (right) Driving upward with the legs AND creating a quick, short push out of the shoulders; get the weight moving in a circular path upward until its just short of directly overhead.


Step 3: Pause for just a moment at the top. This pause will require your entire core, legs, and upper body to contract. Lower the weight along the same path letting it swing between your legs. Repeat using the swinging momentum to get the weight going back up again.

These are advanced moves. You should consult a personal trainer or cycling coach to learn the form and technique before you employ these moves.

Companion article: Winter Training 1
Lifting during the winter can go a long way to shore up any inadequacies that a cyclist may have and equalize left to right imbalances.

Ainslie MacEachran is a AAAI/ISMA certifed personal trainer, the head coach and owner of www.geminitrainingsystems.com and the co-0owner of Orchards Athletic Club in Loveland, Colorado. For companion videos you can email Ainslie through the website.

Ainslie MacEachran:
Planning Your Season 2010
Resolve To Do Nothing...Sort Of
Winter Training 1
The High Protein Myth
Ben Day:
Off Season Break & Winter Training for Cyclists
Riding & Thermo Regulation By Chuck Coyle
Book Review: Racing Weight


Celebrating our tenth year!

Help Support the Daily Peloton  

 
Related Articles
Women Racers: What type of cyclist are you?
102nd Giro di Lombardia - Gilbert Repeats
Interview: World Champion Thor Hushovd

Copyright © 2002-2011 by Daily Peloton.
| contact us |